Earliest Tertiary evolution and radiation of rodents in North America
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Earliest Tertiary evolution and radiation of rodents in North America

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Published by Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh (4400 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh 15213) .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • North America.

Subjects:

  • Rodents, Fossil -- North America.,
  • Paleontology -- Paleocene.,
  • Paleontology -- Eocene.,
  • Paleontology -- North America.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 69-71.

StatementWilliam W. Korth.
SeriesBulletin of Carnegie Museum of Natural History ;, no. 24
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQE882.R6 K67 1984
The Physical Object
Pagination71 p. :
Number of Pages71
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2983443M
LC Control Number84234775

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Oct 03,  · This book is designed as a source and reference for people interested in the history and fossil record of North American tertiary mammals. Each chapter covers a different family or order, and includes information on anatomical features, systematics, the distribution of the genera and species at different fossil localities, and a discussion of their paleobiology/5(2). Korth, William W. , Earliest Tertiary evolution and radiation of rodents in North America / William W. Korth Carnegie Museum of Natural History Pittsburgh ( Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh ). Aug 01,  · Cite Virginia L. Naples, Evolution of Tertiary Mammals of North America. This book has undertaken a huge task, that of bringing order to the information available for the diverse assemblage of terrestrial mammals that appeared, diversified, and sometimes became extinct over the last 65 Cited by: Overview of Context for the Evolution of North American Tertiary Mammals: 1. The chronological, climatic, and paleogeographic background to North American mammalian evolution Donald R. Prothero; 2. Tertiary vegetation of North America as a context for mammalian evolution Scott L. Wing; 3.

Evolution of Tertiary Mammals of North America: Volume 1, Terrestrial Carnivores, Ungulates, and Ungulate Like Mammals. This book is a unique compendium and synthesis of the cumulative knowledge of more than years of discovery and study of North American tertiary mammals.5/5(1). LATE EOCENE RODENT RADIATIONS" NORTH AMERICA, EUROPE AND ASIA by MARY R. DAWSON" ABSTRACT RgSUM A review of the middle Eocene through ear!y Oligocene history of rodents in North America, Europe and Asia shows different develop,ments in the three prideinpill.com by: Since the earliest classifications of mammals, rabbits and hares were considered very closely related to the rodents. Linnaeus () included these groups in the same order, Glires. This arrangement was followed by nearly all of the early workers (e.g., Cuvier, ; Brandt, ).Author: William W. Korth. Evolution of Tertiary Mammals of North America As with Volume 1, this book lays out, in a standardized format, the distribution in time and space of each taxon. It summarizes the Evolution of Tertiary Mammals of North America, Volume 2: Small Mammals, Xenarthrans, and Marine Mammals.

Evolution of Tertiary Mammals of North America. Volume 1: Terrestrial Carnivores, Ungulates, and Ungulatelike Mammals. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom, . Earliest Tertiary evolution and radiation of rodents in North America. Bulletin of Carnegie Museum of Natural History Belongs to Paramys according to K. D. Rose et al. See also Korth Part I: Overview of context for the evolution of North American Tertiary mammals The chronological, climatic, and paleogeographic background to North American mammalian evolution 9 DONALD R. PROTHERO Tertiary vegetation of North-America as a context for mammalian evolution 37 SCOTT L. WING, The Pleistocene terrestrial mammal fauna of North. Apr 01,  · ] (phylogenetic fuse), but the intense radiation occurred rapidly in the early Tertiary and, although there is little evidence for an exact timescale for bird evolution, the evolution of whales (the ‘poster child’ for macroevolution) from terrestrial ungulates is well documented at.