Terminology of library and information science
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Terminology of library and information science a selective glossary by Theodore Christian Hines

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Published by School of Library Service, Columbia University in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Library science -- Dictionaries.,
  • Information science -- Dictionaries.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statement(By) Theodore C. Hines (and) Jessica L. Harris.
ContributionsHarris, Jessica Lee., Columbia University. School of Library Service.
The Physical Object
Pagination41 l ;
Number of Pages41
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21526574M

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Books shelved as library-and-information-science: Foundations of Library and Information Science by Richard E. Rubin, Management Basics for Information P. Includes not only the terminology of the various specializations within library science and information studies but also the vocabulary of publishing, printing, binding, the book trade, graphic arts, book history, literature, bibliography, telecommunications, and computer science when, in the author's judgment, a definition might prove helpful to librarians and information specialists in their work.   The Dictionary of Information Science and Technology is comprised of 2 volumes containing o unique terms, acronyms, and definitions relating to all aspects of the information science and technology field. This dictionary and any subsequent editions or revisions, will be useful in large university reference collections and is recommended for all libraries supporting library . Common Library Terms & Acronyms. history, sociology, linguistics, art, film studies, philosophy, economy business, political science, and international relations pertaining to each region. Area of shelving in a library where books and periodicals are stored.

  D. Database A system that organizes and arranges data into fields and provides the means to sort, group, and retrieve information from those fields. In the library, a database is an electronic index that contains information about articles, books, reference sources, and/or images. Most databases can be searched by fields like author, title of article and publication, and date. Presently, information materials are of different types but, initially the library used to deal with books only. The thinkers and scholars of library and information science mentioned book selection policy in their writings, instead of acquisition policy. Hence, in the literature. The “Library and knowledge Science (LIS)” is made by merging the concept of “library science” and “information science”, and it’s the tutorial and professional study of issues associated with libraries and therefore the informatics that has how information and knowledge carriers are produced, disseminated, discovered, evaluated, selected, acquired, used, organized, maintained, and managed.   Abstract: A brief summary of a book or article. Access points: This is an old-fashioned library term, referring to the headings on library catalog cards that allowed alphabetical access to a book by title, author, or an online database, the access points are the searchable fields such as subject, title and ses that include a thesaurus are also searchable by specialized.

library as an organization of information resources meant for use. The Issues The above perceptions underpin the justification for a variety of definitions of the library by different people. The answer to such question as “what is a library’’ may seem quite simple and straight-forward to provide; since many wouldFile Size: KB. Featuring thousands of revised and brand new entries, the fourth edition of ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science presents a thorough yet concise guide to the specific words that describe the materials, processes and systems relevant to the field of librarianship.   Broad in scope, ODLIS includes not only the terminology of the various specializations within LIS but also the vocabulary of publishing, printing, binding, the book trade, graphic arts, book history, literature, bibliography, telecommunications, and computer science when, in the author's judgment, a definition might prove useful to librarians.   The library community has developed many standards with which (meta)data (records with information about entities such as books) can be represented. An issue in charting the available standards in this report is that different terms are being used to describe those standards, in both the library and Linked Data communities.